the forest

a thought for you...

earthstory:

Look at the size of these trees!

These are coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California. The park is home to the largest continuous block of old-growth redwood forest left on the planet- with some 10,000 acres.

The alluvial flats along its creeks and rivers are prime redwood habitats. The mix of rich soils, water, and fog rolling in from the ocean have produced the planet’s tallest forest. Of the 180 known redwoods greater than 350 feet, more than 130 grow here.

Coastal redwoods can be up to 379 feet (115.5 m) in height (without the roots) and up to 26 feet (7.9 m) in diameter at breast height.

Research now shows that the older such trees get, the more wood they put on- nice to see even trees go through a midlife spread!

-Jean

Photograph by Michael Nichols, National Geographic

Architecture has a big problem, and its name is labor. Everyone in the profession knows it, and yet no one wants to talk about it. In a fierce industry where overwork and undervalued labor are elevated as virtues, those architects—particularly younger architects fresh out of school—who are moved to speak up are quickly dissuaded from doing so. The message is simple: forget your social life; make do with your meager wage; pay your dues. If you can’t handle all of that, then architecture isn’t for you.

But why do things have to be this way?

They Don’t

Meet The Architecture Lobby

Via

studiogeneric do you know these guys?

(via ryanpanos)

darkryemag:

They come over with a bag that’s got haloumi, wine, crusty bread because they went by the bakery on the way. And everyone plops down somewhere in the kitchen, and we set up little prep stations, everyone with their little corner. There’s music and chopping and I always wish for more knives and butcher blocks. We make a meal together that goes well into the night.

A great supper begins by putting guests to work.

(Source: nylonpinksy, via rainysundaysandcoffee)

wibnutler:

William Christenberry

Kudzu and Road, Hale County, Alabama, October 1996

Ektacolor Brownie print

(Source: pacemacgill.com)

Fixed. theme by Andrew McCarthy